For centuries, stinging nettles have been brewed into medicinal tea that naturally contains profuse amounts of biologically active compounds that improves general health. (Photo Credits)

For centuries, stinging nettles have been brewed into medicinal tea that naturally contains profuse amounts of biologically active compounds that improves general health. (Photo Credits)

For most people, being stung by a nettle is an experience that’s quite difficult to forget. Much of the difficulty springs from the burning sensation, the hives, and the blisters that often result from a nettle sting. Stinging nettles are quite popular—thriving in places all across the globe and blooming every year—that it’s quite impossible to be unfamiliar with this invasive plant.

Nettle, more popularly known as the stinging nettle, is a native shrub that belongs to genus Urtica that that thrives in the colder regions of Europe and Asia. True to its name, the leaves and stems of stinging nettles are known to release natural chemicals that irritate the skin.

Despite its rather infamous reputation, stinging nettles has long been part of traditional herbal medicine. For centuries, stinging nettles have been brewed into medicinal tea that naturally contains profuse amounts of biologically active compounds that improves general health.

Nettle Tea as Traditional Medicine

For hundreds of years, stinging nettles have been used in traditional herbal medicine. Nettle tea is known to be a natural curative for arthritis and gout, for anemia, and urinary discomfort. Nettles have also been used as a topical agent in treating eczema, insect bites, skin allergies and even painful muscles.

But about the health benefits of stinging nettle tea?

The root and leaves of stinging nettles possess various biologically active compounds. These include flavonoids such as quercetin which possesses profound antioxidant properties. Antioxidants counteract free radicals that result from oxidative stress. Without sufficient antioxidant presence in the body, free radicals often prove to be detrimental to cellular membranes and DNA.

Nettles also possess a number of healthy compounds. Beta-sitosterol, for instance, found in nettles helps your heart by lowering dietary fats levels in your blood.

Harvesting Stinging Nettles

Stinging nettles are called as such for good reason. A momentary brush with any part of the plant will cause your skin a mildly painful irritation that can last for a couple of hours. It is imperative that you wear gloves partnered with long-sleeved tops and long pants when harvesting nettles. It is best to use a pair of garden clippers or sharp enough scissors to cut the top two bracts of nettle leaves. This way, you still allow for the rest of the nettle plant to regenerate.

Brewing Nettle Tea

Because of its relevant medicinal properties that treat various skin conditions, people are taking interest in learning how to make organic nettle tea recipe for acne.

A fresh cup of nettle tea requires about a cupful of fresh nettles leaves. First, place the nettle leaves you have gathered into a container— a pot or a kettle would be ideal. It best to add two cups of water for every cup of nettle leaves. Once done, you just bring the water to a boil.

Depending on your preferred taste, you can enjoy a stronger nettle flavor by letting the mixture steep longer. Should you want a milder flavor, you just simply add more water. Once the water has boiled, reduce heat and let simmer for a few minutes.

Pour through a small strainer and you have yourself a fresh cup of nettle tea to drink— and a brimful of organic nettle leaf tea benefits. For an added dash of sweetness, you might add a dash of sugar or honey.

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